CUDDLY SCORPION

US 5 dpns

 

First, make the body.  If you don’t like doing short rows (rows 7, 11, 15, etc), you can skip them, but they add a bit of extra curve to the finished scorpion.

 

Cast on 6 stitches, evenly distributed on three dpns.

Leave a six inch tail to use in joining the tail later on.

Place a marker between the first and second stitch to mark the first needle throughout.

 

Row

1

*k2*

(2 2 2)

Row

2

*kfb k*

(3 3 3)

Row

3

*2kfb k*

(5 5 5)

Row

4

*kfb k2 kfb k*

(7 7 7)

Row

5

*kfb k6*

(8 8 8 )

Row

6

*k8*

(8 8 8 )

Row

7

p8 p8 k8 wrap turn

 

 

 

p8 wrap turn

 

 

 

k8

(8 8 8 )

Row

8

*k8*

(8 8 8 )

Row

9

*k8*

(8 8 8 )

Row

10

*k8*

(8 8 8 )

Row

11

p8 p8 k8 wrap turn

 

 

 

p8 wrap turn

 

 

 

k8

(8 8 8 )

Row

12

*k8*

(8 8 8 )

Row

13

*k8*

(8 8 8 )

Row

14

*k8*

(8 8 8 )

Row

15

p8 p8 k8 wrap turn

 

 

 

p8 wrap turn

 

 

 

k8

(8 8 8 )

Row

16

*k8*

(8 8 8 )

Row

17

*k8*

(8 8 8 )

Row

18

*k8*

(8 8 8 )

Row

19

p8 p8 k8

(8 8 8 )

Row

20

*k8*

(8 8 8 )

Row

21

*k8*

(8 8 8 )

Row

22

*k8*

(8 8 8 )

Row

23

p8 p8 k8

(8 8 8 )

Row

24

*k8*

(8 8 8 )

Row

25

*k8*

(8 8 8 )

Row

26

*k8*

(8 8 8 )

Row

27

p8 p8 k8

(8 8 8 )

Row

28

*k8*

(8 8 8 )

Row

29

*k8*

(8 8 8 )

Row

30

*k8*

(8 8 8 )

Row

31

p8 p8 k8

(8 8 8 )

 

On the next row, rearrange the stitches from the second to the first needle.

 

Row

32

k7 p2 k1 k6 k8

(10 6 8 )

Row

33

k7 p2 k1 k6 k8

(10 6 8 )

Row

34

k7 p2 k1 k6 k8

(10 6 8 )

Row

35

k7 p2 k1 k6 k8

(10 6 8 )

Row

36

k7 p2 k1 k6 k8

(10 6 8 )

Row

37

k7 p2 k1 k6 k8

(10 6 8 )

Row

38

k7 p2 k1 k6 k8

(10 6 8 )

 

Stuff the body to this point, and continue stuffing as you continue to the pincers.

 

Row

39

k2tog k6 k6 k2tog k8

(7 7 8 )

Row

40

k8 k6 k8

(8 6 8 )

Row

41

4k2tog 3k2tog k3 k2tog k3

(4 3 7)

 

 

start stuffing here

 

Row

42

k4 k3 k7

(4 3 7)

Row

43

k2 k2tog k3 k2 k2tog k3

(3 3 6)

Row

44

k4 k3 k5

(4 3 5)

Row

45

k2 k2tog k k2 k2tog k3

(4 2 4)

 

From here on use only two needles to hold the stitches and a third to knit.

 

Row

46

5k2tog

(2 3)

Row

47

k2 k2tog k

(2 2)

 

With needle one, knit a 4 row 2 stitch I-cord.

Bind off by sewing through both stitches, having cut 12 inches of yarn, and sew the yarn back to the tip of the body through the I-cord in order to knit with it again.

With needle two, knit a 4 row 2 stitch I-cord.

Bind off by sewing through both stitches and weave yarn back to tip of body, sewing together any gap between the pincers you have just made.

 

SCORPION TAIL

 

Cast on 6 stitches, evenly distributed on three dpns.

Leave a six inch tail to use in joining to the body later on.

Place a marker between the first and second stitch to mark the first needle throughout.

 

Row

1

*k2*

(2 2 2)

Row

2

*kfb k*

(3 3 3)

Row

3

*kfb k2*

(4 4 4)

Row

4

*kfb k3*

(5 5 5)

Row

5

*kfb k4*

(6 6 6)

Row

6

*kfb k5*

(7 7 7)

Row

7

kfb k6 kfb k6 wrap turn

 

 

 

p8 p8 wrap turn

 

 

 

k8 k8 kfb k6

(8 8 8 )

Row

8

*k2tog k6*

(7 7 7)

Row

9

*k2tog k5*

(6 6 6)

Row

10

*k2tog k4*

(5 5 5)

Row

11

*k2tog k3*

(4 4 4)

Row

12

*k2tog k2* stuff to this point

(3 3 3)

Row

13

*k2tog k1*

(2 2 2)

Row

14

*kfb k*

(3 3 3)

Row

15

*kfb k2*

(4 4 4)

Row

16

*kfb k3*

(5 5 5)

Row

17

*kfb k4*

(6 6 6)

Row

18

kfb k5 kfb k5 wrap turn

 

 

 

p7 p7 wrap turn

 

 

 

k7 k7 kfb k5

(7 7 7)

Row

19

*k2tog k5*

(6 6 6)

Row

20

*k2tog k4*

(5 5 5)

Row

21

*k2tog k3*

(4 4 4)

Row

22

*k2tog k2* stuff to this point

(3 3 3)

Row

23

*k2tog k1*

(2 2 2)

Row

24

*kfb k*

(3 3 3)

Row

25

*kfb k2*

(4 4 4)

Row

26

*kfb k3*

(5 5 5)

Row

27

kfb k4 kfb k4 wrap turn

 

 

 

p6 p6 wrap turn

 

 

 

k6 k6 kfb k4

(6 6 6)

Row

28

*k2tog k4*

(5 5 5)

Row

29

*k2tog k3*

(4 4 4)

Row

30

*k2tog k2* stuff to this point

(3 3 3)

Row

31

*k2tog k1*

(2 2 2)

Row

32

*kfb k*

(3 3 3)

Row

33

*kfb k2*

(4 4 4)

Row

34

kfb k3 kfb k3 wrap turn

 

 

 

p5 p5 wrap turn

 

 

 

k5 k5 kfb k3

(5 5 5)

Row

35

*k2tog k3*

(4 4 4)

Row

36

*k2tog k2* stuff to this point

(3 3 3)

Row

37

*k2tog k1*

(2 2 2)

Row

38

*kfb k*

(3 3 3)

Row

39

kfb k2 kfb k2 wrap turn

 

 

 

p4 p4 wrap turn

 

 

 

k4 k4 kfb k2

(4 4 4)

Row

40

*k2tog k2* stuff to this point

(3 3 3)

Row

41

*k2tog k1*

(2 2 2)

Row

42

kfb k kfb k wrap turn

 

 

 

p3 p3 wrap turn

 

 

 

k3 k3 kfb k

(3 3 3)

Row

43

*k2tog k1*

(2 2 2)

Row

44

*k2*

(2 2 2)

Row

45

*k2*

(2 2 2)

Row

46

*kfb k*

(3 3 3)

Row

47

*kfb k2*

(4 4 4)

Row

48

*kfb k3*

(5 5 5)

Row

49

k5 kfb k4 k5

(5 6 5)

Row

50

k5 k6 k5

(5 6 5)

Row

51

k2tog k3 k2tog k2 k2tog k2tog k3

(4 4 4)

Row

52

k4 k4 k4

(4 4 4)

Row

53

k2tog k2 k2tog k2tog k2 k2tog

(3 2 3)

Row

54

k3 k2 k3 stuff to this point

(3 2 3)

Row

55

k3 k2tog k3

(3 1 3)

Row

56

k3 k1 k3

(3 1 3)

Row

57

k2tog k1 k1 k1 k2tog

(2 1 2)

Row

58

k2tog k1 k2tog

(1 1 1)

 

Bind off by pulling yarn through all three remaining stitches, leaving about 4” of yarn to sew first into the first three rows, then pulling across a row and sharply into the body or the barb in order to make a sharp downward turn to the barb (check out Molly Lincoln’s lobster claws to get a better understanding of how to do this shaping.  You’ll be doing it again on the claws next.  http://dirigo.wordpress.com/2007/12/17/free-pattern-toy-lobster/)

 

SCORPION CLAWS (make two)

Huge thanks and credit to Molly Lincoln for inspiring me and letting me adapt her lobster claw pattern.  Her instructions kick my instructions’ butt, so check her’s out to get a better sense of what to do for the final shaping. http://dirigo.wordpress.com/2007/12/17/free-pattern-toy-lobster/

 

Cast on 6 stitches, evenly distributed on three dpns.

Leave a six inch tail to use in joining to the body later on.

Place a marker between the first and second stitch to mark the first needle throughout.

 

Row

1

*k2*

(2 2 2)

Row

2

*k2*

(2 2 2)

Row

3

*k2*

(2 2 2)

Row

4

*kfb k1*

(3 3 3)

Row

5

*k3*

(3 3 3)

Row

6

*k3*

(3 3 3)

Row

7

*k3*

(3 3 3)

Row

8

*k3*

(3 3 3)

Row

9

*k3*

(3 3 3)

Row

10

*k3* stuff to this point

(3 3 3)

Row

11

*k2tog k1*

(2 2 2)

Row

12

*k2*

(2 2 2)

Row

13

*kfb k1*

(3 3 3)

Row

14

*k3*

(3 3 3)

Row

15

2kfb k1 2kfb k1 k3

(5 5 3)

Row

16

k5 k5 k3

(5 5 3)

Row

17

4kfb k1 kfb k2 kfb k1 k3

(9 7 3)

Row

18

k9 k7 k3

(9 7 3)

Row

19

k9 k7 k3

(9 7 3)

 

On the next round, drop the stitch marker.

 

Row

20

k9 k7 

(9 7) (3)

 

Leave the three stitches on needle 3 and use a fourth dpn to knit the first three stitches on old needle 1 (place marker between the 4th and 5th stitches, making this the new needle 1).  Ignore the three stitches on old needle three until later, or place on a stitch holder.

 

 

Row

21

k5 k4 k7

(5 4 7) (3)

Row

22

k5 k4 k7

(5 4 7) (3)

Row

23

k2tog k3 k1 k2tog k1 k3 2k2tog

(4 3 5) (3)

Row

24

k4 k3 k5 stuff to this point

(4 3 5) (3)

Row

25

k2tog k2 k1 k2tog k2tog k1 k2tog

(3 2 3) (3)

Row

26

k3 k2 k3

(3 2 3) (3)

Row

27

k3 k2tog k3

(3 1 3) (3)

Row

28

k3 k1 k3

(3 1 3) (3)

Row

29

k2tog k1 k1 k1 k2tog

(2 1 2) (3)

Row

30

k2tog k1 k2tog

(1 1 1) (3)

 

Bind off by cutting 6 inches of yarn and threading through the three live stitches you’re working with.  Later, use the tail to curl the claw by weaving in the first three rows and pulling tight across the opening of the claw before as Molly shows for the lobster.

 

Go back to the three stitches you kept live on the other needle or on a stitch holder.  Tie a new piece of yarn onto the stitch below the three live stitches and weave the end into the claw.  Knit an I-cord:

 

Row

1

k3, push stitches to other end of dpn

(3)

Row

2

k3, push stitches to other end of dpn

(3)

Row

3

k3, push stitches to other end of dpn

(3)

Row

4

k3, push stitches to other end of dpn

(3)

Row

5

k3, push stitches to other end of dpn

(3)

Row

6

k3, push stitches to other end of dpn

(3)

Row

7

k2tog k1, push stitches to other end of dpn

(2)

Row

8

k2tog

(1)

 

Bind off by cutting yarn and threading through the remaining stitch.  Pull tight and leave a tail to weave in and create the “curved thumb” of the the claw (again, haven’t you read Molly’s instructions?  If not, stop here and just make her lobster first.  You know you want to anyway.  The scorpion will wait.  That’s what scorpions do.  They’re patient.  http://dirigo.wordpress.com/2007/12/17/free-pattern-toy-lobster/)

 

LEGS

The legs are easy, but are hard to write out, so bear with me.

You make 8 of them, four on each side.

I recommend attaching the claws to the body first on the underside of the body, just where the head starts to taper down.  Make sure the claws jut outwards and then come back in, like a real scorpion if you can.

 

The first set of legs goes just in front of the first purl row on the body, just behind where you attached the claws, and the subsequent three go between the first four purl rows on the body.

 

All you need to do is pick up two of the stitches from the body, even to where the purl rows start, but you’re picking up on the horizontal plane of the body now.

 

Start your yarn by tying your yarn onto the body leaving a 6 inch tail.  Now make a 2-stitch I-cord in the following manner:

 

Knit 12 rows of 2-stitch I-cord.

On the 13th row, on the first stitch knit through not only the first stitch on the needle, but also the stitch below.  Pull both the lower stitch and your new stitch through as a single stitch before you stitch the second stitch of the row.

You now have three stitches.

On the 14th row, knit the first two stitches together to return to a two stitch I-cord.  This creates a joint in the leg.

Do the same joint creation on the 21st row, returning to two stitches on the 22nd.

Knit 40 rows in total for a leg with two joints (12 rows 8 rows 20 rows).

On the 41st row, k2tog.

Cut the yarn, sewing through the last stitch to bind off.  Pull the yarn through the final five rows of the I-cord and pull tight.  This makes a foot pad.

 

Now, return to the tail of yarn from when you started the leg at the body.  With a tapestry needle, use this tail to securely attach the first six row of the leg to the body vertically before you weave in the remaining yarn.  This allows the leg to curl upwards and, with the joints you made, give it a crawly feel.

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Published in: on October 30, 2008 at 9:18 pm  Comments (16)  

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16 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. What’s dpns? Dips per nanosecond?
    Drako pro nonsequitor?
    Dunce perpetrates non-spiel?

    • double-pointed needles… they are used to knit things in the round. for example, knitting a sock in the round. you don’t have to sew it up afterwards.

  2. What? I don’t understand a word you’re saying.

  3. Double Pointed Needles

  4. Amazing! Can I link to you in my blog?

  5. Wow! You are extremely talented!

  6. [...] on October 30, 2008 at 4:19 pm CUDDLY SCORPION « Rustleaire’s Blog [...]

  7. Cool, what kind of yarn did you use?

    • I used a grey Hombre by Stacy Charles, which is 60% cashmere, 31% merino, 5% silk, and 4% other. 12 ply (7 wpi).

  8. Great pattern (and a nod to Molly Lincoln – I’ve also made her lobster). I changed the scorpion legs; I thought the originals looked more like jellyfish tentacles. So: try knitting 4 12″ 3-stitch I-cords. Find 4 12″ craft-supply-type pipe cleaners, same color as the yarn if possible. Make a long “needle” by bending each end of a 15″ piece of soft metal wire (one end tight, to provide a smooth end for threading; one end a small loop). Attach end of pipe cleaner to the loop and thread the p.c. through the I-cord, one for each set of legs. Using orig. yarn, attach the middle of each p.c./leg set to the body, on the outside (this looks fine on the finished work). Then bend each leg so it approximates real scorpion legs – see Google. This way, the legs look more natural and the scorpion can actually stand up and look more menacing. I have a photo of mine stalking a 4″ Ant (pattern available).

  9. I love your lobster and the scorpion is good too. I am looking for a pattern for shrimp. My granddaughters love to play with knitted & crocheted food & one of their favorites is to pretend to make gumbo ~ ala The Princess & the frog. I knit & my wife crochets. If you have a pattern for shrimp or know of one, I would greatly appreciate it.

    Thank you, Ken (the knitting grandpa)

  10. Ken, there are a few good shrimp patterns on Ravelry, available for a small fee… with these odder requests (scorpions? Really?) I think just playing around with increases and decreases with a neutral yarn would tell you where to go. I know Hansi Signh does a nice nautilus shell which might serve as a good basis for experimenting.

    -Russell

  11. cute!!!!! my cousin loves bugs, so i made a groung and used smaller needles to make the scorpion smaaler and i put tons of crocheted and knitted bugs and sewed them to the ground and then i gave it to her for christmas. oh i made the legs in i-cod fashion. bye!

  12. May I please ask what size knitting needles you used? I don’t see that information in the pattern. How big is t his scorpion when finished? What kind of yarn did you use. Thank you for whatever response you may give.

    • I made mine with US 5 needles, and it came out to 5 1/2″ long and 6 1/2″ tall, using Stacy Charles Hombre yarn:
      Weight Bulky / 12 ply (7 wpi) Wraps per inch Yardage
      103 yards (94 meters) Unit weight
      50 grams (1.76 ounces)Gauge
      14.0 sts = 4 inches

      But others have used smaller needles and tighter yarns. You just need to be certain that you would he showing stuffing through your sticked when finished.

  13. [...] with fingering weight wool on US1 needles. He’s about palm-sized. Free “Cuddly Scorpion” pattern by Russell [...]


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